Mary Louise McLaws Death, Wikipedia, Epidemiologist, Husband, Died

Mary Louise McLaws Death, Wikipedia, Epidemiologist, Husband, Died

Mary Louise McLaws Death, Wikipedia, Epidemiologist, Husband, Died -: Epidemiologist Mary-Louise McLaws AO was from Australia. She spent more than 30 years teaching epidemiology at the University of New South Wales and specialized in infectious illnesses.

Mary Louise McLaws Death, Wikipedia, Epidemiologist, Husband, Died
Mary Louise McLaws Death, Wikipedia, Epidemiologist, Husband, Died

Mary Louise McLaws Bio

Australian epidemiologist Mary-Louise McLaws AO (née Viney; 17 March 1953 – 12 August 2023) passed away on that date. She spent more than 30 years teaching epidemiology at the University of New South Wales and specialized in infectious illnesses. She became a “household name” in Australia during the COVID-19 pandemic as a result of her consistent work in educating the public about the illness.

The daughter of Barry and Louise Viney, McLaws was born in Tasmania on March 17, 1953. Before relocating to the Central Coast, where she attended Gosford High School, she and her older brother spent their formative years living with their mother in Bondi, New South Wales. She adopted her stepfather Bruce McLaws’ last name. She grew up in a Jewish household. McLaws studied at the University of Sydney, earning a bachelor’s degree in science before going on to get a master’s degree in public health in 1988, a doctorate in philosophy in 1992, and a diploma in tropical public health in 1984.

At Sydney’s National Centre for HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research, McLaws got her start as a research scientist. She was hired as a lecturer at the University of New South Wales School of Public Health in 1992. In 1996, she was elevated to senior lecturer; in 2002, to associate professor; and in 2007, to professor.

Hospital infection control, infectious disease surveillance, and the epidemiology of newly developing infectious diseases were the main areas of interest for McLaws’ study. Her work has had a considerable influence on public health policy and practice, and she was a leading specialist in the field of infection prevention and control.

McLaws regularly contributed to the media throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, offering the general people advice and information based on his professional experience. She also served on the Experts Advisory Panel for Infection Prevention and Control Preparedness, Readiness, and Response to COVID-19 for the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Health Emergencies Programme.

In the 2022 Queen’s Birthday Honours, McLaws received an Order of Australia (AO) for her contributions to epidemiology, infection prevention, and health administration.

McLaws lost his fight with brain cancer on August 12, 2023, at the age of 70. Her husband Richard Flook and their two kids are left behind.

McLaws was a renowned epidemiologist with considerable influence who made important contributions to the field of public health. She worked tirelessly to promote infection prevention and control, and her efforts contributed to the preservation of numerous lives. She will be regarded as a trailblazer in her industry and a staunch supporter of public health.

Mary Louise McLaws Career

Mary-Louise McLaws AO (née Viney; 17 March 1953 – 12 August 2023) was an Australian epidemiologist who specialized in infectious diseases. She was a professor of epidemiology at the University of New South Wales for over 30 years. During the COVID-19 pandemic, she became a “household name” in Australia, regularly providing public information and advice on the disease.

McLaws’ career in epidemiology spanned over 30 years. She began her career as a research scientist at the National Centre for HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research in Sydney. In 1992, she was appointed as a lecturer in the School of Public Health at the University of New South Wales. She was promoted to senior lecturer in 1996, associate professor in 2002, and professor in 2007.

McLaws’ research interests focused on hospital infection control, infectious disease surveillance, and the epidemiology of emerging infectious diseases. She was a leading expert in the field of infection prevention and control, and her work has had a significant impact on public health policy and practice.

McLaws’ most notable achievements include:

  • Developing the first surveillance system for healthcare-associated infections in New South Wales
  • Leading the development of infection prevention and control guidelines for hospitals in Australia
  • Advising the World Health Organization on infection prevention and control during the SARS and COVID-19 pandemics
  • Providing expert advice to the Australian government on infection prevention and control during the COVID-19 pandemic

McLaws was a highly respected and influential epidemiologist who made significant contributions to the field of public health. She was a tireless advocate for infection prevention and control, and her work helped to save countless lives. She will be remembered as a pioneer in her field and a true champion for public health.

Here is a timeline of McLaws’ career:

  • 1984: Graduates with a diploma in tropical public health from the University of Sydney
  • 1988: Graduates with a Master of Public Health from the University of Sydney
  • 1992: Graduates with a Doctor of Philosophy from the University of Sydney
  • 1992: Appointed as a lecturer in the School of Public Health at the University of New South Wales
  • 1996: Promoted to senior lecturer
  • 2002: Promoted to associate professor
  • 2007: Promoted to professor
  • 2015: Awarded an Order of Australia (AO) for her service to epidemiology, infection prevention, and health administration
  • 2020: Becomes a household name in Australia for her public information and advice on COVID-19
  • 2023: Dies of brain cancer at the age of 70

McLaws’ death was a great loss to the field of public health. She was a brilliant scientist, a dedicated educator, and a passionate advocate for infection prevention and control. Her work will continue to benefit people around the world for many years to come.

Mary Louise McLaws News

Epidemiologist Mary-Louise McLaws, who led Australia through Covid, passes away at the age of 70 from brain cancer.

The epidemiologist who helped Australians through the Covid-19 pandemic, Professor Mary-Louise McLaws, passed away from brain cancer at the age of 70.

According to a statement to the Sydney Morning Herald from her husband Richard Flook, McLaws passed away on Saturday night while she was sleeping.

She had received such excellent care from the staff at Woollahra’s Wolper Hospital, and Flook noted that she had appreciated the numerous friends who had visited her and been so kind to our family.

The funeral service for McLaws will be organized by the family in the upcoming days and held at the Emanuel Synagogue in Sydney’s eastern suburbs.

McLaws received a brain cancer diagnosis in January of last year.

As one of 92 Australians honored in a special Covid-19 honor roll in last year’s Queen’s Birthday honors, she received an Order of Australia for her contributions to epidemiology, infection prevention, and health management.

Professor of epidemiology at the University of New South Wales, McLaws served as an independent advisor to the World Health Organization’s health emergencies program on Covid infection and control as well as a member of the NSW Clinical Excellence Commission’s Covid infection prevention and control taskforce.

Her WHO meetings frequently took place at night and lasted into the wee hours of the morning due to time zone variations. McLaws admitted to being “constantly jetlagged” to Guardian Australia in 2021, but she was always willing to forgo sleep in order to stay educated on cutting-edge, constantly evolving scientific research.

During the first two years of the Covid-19 pandemic, she gained notoriety outside of the medical community by devoting a large portion of her time to spreading crucial health messages about infection control and frequently making herself readily available to journalists at all hours to assist with their understanding of epidemiology.

McLaws’ death was described as “such sad news” by the federal health minister, Mark Butler, on ABC Radio.

Her speech was very calm and eloquent at a time when Australians were tremendously afraid. The Australian people found it to be a great source of comfort to hear her on programs like yours and to see her on TV explain the best way we could defend ourselves in a very calm but authoritative and clear way, Butler added.

Butler stated, “But it was only a small portion of a lifetime career she devoted to epidemiology and infectious illnesses, especially in NSW in areas like HIV and viral hepatitis.

Her passing was referred to as “a terrible loss for the country” by Prof. Steve Robson, president of the Australian Medical Association.

“I was devastated to learn of Professor McLaws’ passing,” Robson added. She was a huge figure both locally and internationally. Her advice at the worst of the pandemic aided both the nation and the profession.

“During the peak of the pandemic, the AusSMC was running a 24/7 news service, helping journalists find the right expert to help make sense of the confusing information about the virus,” said Dr. Susannah Eliott, CEO of the Australian Science Media Centre, which frequently spoke with McLaws about Covid and shared her insights with journalists.

“Our team’s go-to phrase whenever we had a really challenging question was, “Ring Mary-Louise,” since we knew she had the answers to almost all of them and would go above and beyond to assist. Eliott recalled that she was always composed, reasonable, and available.

“She was a very outstanding science communicator. She had a gift for relating to people via her limitless empathy and sincere desire to assist. She was also exceedingly humble, seeking criticism in her interviews and being receptive to advice on how to do better.

“When we learned of her sickness, we were saddened. We, as well as scientists and journalists, will miss her dearly.

I once asked her, believing she might respond to a few emails if she would assist my son with his research project on antibiotic resistance. She invited him to come to see her at UNSW, spent almost an hour talking with him, and encouraged him to pursue a career in science after high school.

“We mourn the passing of a UNSW academic who was locally raised and rose to fame while remaining tenacious, humble, hardworking, and caring,” said David Gonski, chancellor of UNSW.

“She will not be forgotten. We are grateful for everything she did for UNSW and Australia.”

The university’s head of medicine and health, Professor Vlado Perkovic, said McLaws was a tremendous force and will be sorely missed.

Her groundbreaking research, steadfast dedication, and relentless pursuit of advancements in infection control were characterized by her 36 years at UNSW Medicine & Health, which helped save countless lives.

Former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull commended McLaws at a ceremony last year honoring her career at the institution, saying: “You spoke the truth, you took on the pandemic of disinformation, you helped keep us safe, for that we owe you so much.”

Zia and Zachary, as well as McLaws’ spouse Richard, are left behind.

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